Most college students are young and healthy, but an illness or accident can happen to anyone. Student health insurance can protect your health and finances – but the rate of uninsured young adults is higher than any age group with about 30% uninsured. If faced with unexpected medical expenses, you could end up in debt that could keep you from completing your degree.

Explore your options for getting health insurance as a student, which include a parents’ plan, one at school or work, or a plan from the Health Insurance Marketplace.

What You Should Know About Student Health Insurance

  • You can’t stay on your parents’ plan forever: With a few exceptions, when you turn 26 you’re no longer able to stay on your parents’ health insurance policy.
  • Your employer or school may offer plans: If you have a job, your employer may have a group plan you can use. Many schools offer sponsored health insurance plans.
  • You may qualify for assistance: You can apply for individual insurance through the Health Insurance Marketplace. In the marketplace, you can check to see if you are eligible for subsidies to help you pay monthly premiums.

What Are the Best Health Insurance Options for College Students and Young Adults?

There are numerous ways to get affordable student and young adult health insurance. Options include staying on your parents’ plan if you’re under age 26, enrolling in a student or school-sponsored health plan, or the Health Insurance Marketplace.

Parents' health insurance

Staying on your parents’ health insurance plan is sometimes the simplest option. Knowing when you are eligible is important. You may remain on your parents’ plan to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes.

  • Who is it good for? Many students find parent plans to be most beneficial because they save money. If your parents already have a family plan, there may be no price difference to keep you covered.
  • What are its limitations? Many employer-based health plans are not required to cover maternity benefits for dependents. If you live in a different coverage area or state, network providers may not be available to you. In many cases, coverage could stop abruptly if your parent loses his or her job.
  • How do you apply? Employer-based plans usually have a yearly open enrollment period. This is the best time for you to be enrolled on your parents’ plan. Outside of open enrollment, the only way to be eligible to enroll would be a special enrollment period. This is offered at least 30 days after a qualifying event, such as losing other health coverage.

Student or school-sponsored health insurance

As part of the admission process, some schools offer student health insurance or school-sponsored plans. It’s important to know the difference between these options.

School-sponsored plans may only cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school. Often, this plan is more affordable and may include an on-campus pharmacy. The plan is usually only active while you are attending school.

Student health insurance is a regular health insurance plan available to purchase from the school that will cover you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school. It is a more flexible network plan. This plan will typically cover you an entire year even if you stop attending college.

  • Who is it good for? Not all students have the option of coverage under a family plan. These options can be attractive when you are on a budget and want to bundle the cost of your insurance with your tuition and don’t have the option of being covered by a family plan. Financial aid may also be available that helps cover the insurance cost.
  • What are the limitations? It is always good to review the limitations of these types of plans. You want to consider your coverage area and whether required to be enrolled as a full-time student to be eligible for coverage. Some plans may not cover contraception.
  • How do you apply? Colleges and universities sometimes require a form of insurance coverage proof in the admission process. The admissions office for the school you attend is the best point of contact to find out how to enroll and the requirements.

Individual insurance on the open market

You can purchase an insurance plan that provides Affordable Care Act (ACA)-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace. But if your parents claim you as a tax dependent, you may not qualify for any savings because you must include your parents’ income. If you aren’t claimed as a dependent and your annual income is 100% to 400% of the federal poverty level you may qualify for a subsidy.

  • Who is it good for? Students who live outside the state where their parents live and are not covered under the parents’ plan, earn their own income, or have a spouse and dependents often find this an affordable option.
  • What are its limitations? Income can be a factor in the affordability and being able to qualify for this type of coverage. If you are covered as a dependent on your parents Health Insurance Marketplace plan and you live in a different state, network coverage may be limited and you may have fewer providers available to you.
  • How do you apply? The Health Insurance Marketplace is where you can apply for coverage during Open Enrollment or a Special Enrollment Period (SEP). Open enrollment is typically November 1 through December 15, but the government can adjust those dates as they deem necessary.In 2015, recent college graduates became eligible for a SEP through the ACA. This usually occurs because of loss of student health insurance coverage or a change of residence in the last 60 days.

Medicaid

If you’re a student or young adult living independently with a low income and certain life situations, such as pregnancy, or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), you may qualify for free or low-cost health coverage through Medicaid. In some states, you may qualify if you’re under age 21 and a dependent of a parent who receives Medicaid.

  • Who is it good for? Medicaid is a good option for college students with no income, chronic health conditions, or who are pregnant with no other coverage available.
  • What are its limitations? Medicaid rules vary from one state to the next. Some states have not elected to expand Medicaid benefits since the ACA was passed. You must be a resident of the state you are applying to. Income level and dependency status may also limit being able to qualify.
  • How do you apply? You can apply through the Health Insurance Marketplace or contact your state’s Medicaid office.

What Are the Best Health Insurance Options for Recent Grads?

As a college graduate, you may find yourself in a limbo of income and insurance coverage. You are often moving away from the area where you’ve been living or going to school. Starting a new job may cause income adjustments and offer additional options for health insurance. Health Insurance Marketplace, employer plans, COBRA, or short-term health insurance may be more attractive options in this phase of your life.

Budget insurance on the marketplace

The Health Insurance Marketplace, also called the exchange, is where you can find health insurance plans, purchase coverage, and determine whether you qualify for premium and out-of-pocket cost assistance or Medicaid. Subsidies are based on income level. If your annual income is 100% to 400% of the federal poverty level, you may qualify for a subsidy. If you are unsure of how to utilize HealthCare.gov, there are local agents available to assist you that are certified by the Health Insurance Marketplace.

  • Who is it good for? Students who live outside the state where their parents live and are not covered under a parents’ plan, earn their own income, or have a spouse and dependents often find the marketplace an attractive, affordable option.
  • What are its limitations? Income can be a factor in the affordability and being able to qualify for this type of coverage. If you are covered as a dependent on your parents’ Health Insurance Marketplace plan and you live in a different state, network coverage may be limited and you may have fewer providers available to you.
  • How do you apply? The Health Insurance Marketplace is where you can apply for coverage during Open Enrollment or a SEP. Open enrollment is typically November 1 through December 15, but the government can adjust those dates as they deem necessary. In 2015, recent college graduates became eligible for a SEP through the ACA. This usually occurs because of loss of student health insurance coverage or a change of residence in the last 60 days.

Employer health insurance

You may have access to employer-sponsored health insurance as part of your benefits package. Your employer selects one or more group health plans and may pay part of your premium. Part-time employees may not qualify for health insurance.

  • Who is it good for? People who are full time employees often find employer-sponsored health plans to be convenient and affordable.
  • What are its limitations? To qualify for employer health insurance, working full time is usually a requirement. Sometimes, the coverage may not begin until you have completed a probationary period. Some employers do not allow you to add family. Coverage may stop abruptly and terminate the last day of your employment.
  • How do you apply? Most companies will give you benefit options in hiring packages. Human resources or the benefits administrator is usually the point of contact.

COBRA for graduates

The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986 (COBRA) is a federal mandate requiring employers to offer extension of health care benefits to employees after termination of employment. If you are graduating and losing employer-based insurance, COBRA may be an option. Keep in mind that a Student Health Plan is not an employer plan and COBRA is not available.

  • Who is it good for? COBRA is a good alternative if you have recently lost coverage from your current employer or parents’ plan because you aged off at 27.
  • What are its limitations? COBRA is expensive. You may find it is not the most affordable option for your budget. If you lose coverage through your employer, COBRA will usually last for up to 18 months. When aging off of your parents’ plan at age 27, COBRA will typically last up to 36 months.
  • How do you apply? You must complete and return the coverage election form within 60 days of the termination of the prior coverage or turning age 27.

Short-term health insurance

Short-term health insurance offers limited coverage for a short time period, usually 30 to 90 days, but sometimes up to three years. These plans can cover a lapse in long-term insurance due to job loss, change in life situation, or a missed enrollment period. Most short-term plans don’t cover pre-existing conditions, preventive care, maternity care, immunizations, dental, vision, or other specialized services.

  • Who is it good for? Short-term medical plans are a great option when you are looking for affordable insurance with a brief coverage period. It can be a beneficial option in between employment coverage or during your probationary period with a job.
  • What are its limitations? Short-term medical plans aren’t required to meet ACA standards, which offer minimum essential coverage. Most short-term plans don’t cover preexisting conditions, preventive care, maternity care, immunizations, dental, vision, or other specialized services. It also means short-term plans don’t count as qualifying prior coverage if you want to enroll in a long-term ACA plan. Coverage periods may vary by state and insurance company.
  • How do you apply? Not every short-term health plan is available nationwide. Check with each insurer or a licensed insurance agent for availability where you live.

What Are the Best Health Insurance Options for Special-Status Students and Young Adults?

If you’re a student and earned in courses for academic credit but are not seeking a degree, you may be considered a special-status student. Some colleges may have a student health insurance option. Health Insurance Marketplace plans can be an affordable option if you meet the income requirements. If you are classified as a special-status student because of studying abroad, travel insurance can often be a good fit.

What are the health insurance options for homeless students and young adults?

If you’re age 19 or older, you can access Medicaid for at-risk youth and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) ― in states with expanded coverage ― or if you’re under age 26, aged out of the foster system, and were enrolled in Medicaid while in foster care. Youth who are pregnant, parenting, or who have a disability also qualify for Medicaid coverage. Students who have an income too high to qualify for Medicaid or CHIP can apply for coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace.

What are the health insurance options for students going abroad?

A great resource when looking for health insurance for travel is travel.state.gov. This site not only provides information on the plans available, it offers insight into the health insurance requirements for the different types of visas. It will also help you to understand the different types of visas. In most cases, your host school or current school will have some health insurance options available.

What are the health insurance options for pregnant students and young adults?

Several options are available for students who are pregnant. Those options include Medicaid, CHIP, and Health Insurance Marketplace.

What are the health insurance options for married students and young adults?

If you are covered on your parents’ plan and under age 26 you are still eligible to stay on that plan even if you marry. Many student or school-sponsored health plans cover married students. Health Insurance Marketplace is another good option because of multiple coverage options including catastrophic coverage (high deductible plans).

Why Do Students and Young Adults Need Health Insurance? 
Mental health According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness , 75% of all mental health conditions begin by age 24. Statistics like this make it extremely important to start providing tools and resources for better mental health. Transitioning from the shelter of your parents to a more independent life of responsibilities can be stressful. Many times, the stress and inability to cope can lead to depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, and abusive behavior. This is a key time to utilize mental health resources. Learning healthy coping skills and stress management early can lead to healthier and more productive college life. Always make sure when picking a plan you are aware of what type of mental health coverage is available.
Sexual health Identifing optimal health services and resources are key in promoting students’ sexual health. Based on the last statistics reported by the Centers for Disease Control and prevention (CDC) , of the 26 million sexually transmitted infections, 46% were in young people aged 15 to 24. STDs like chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, herpes and HIV are on the rise, but one of the most predominant is human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV accounts for more than 14 million new cases annually. According to the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, 80% of sexually active men and women will be infected in their lifetime. Not only is HPV a virus, it has been found to lead to numerous cancers. Facts like this make it more important than ever for you utilize sexual health resources available through your insurance to prevent and protect your future health.
Lifestyle changes Being out on your own for the first time is a lifestyle change. Not only do your sleep patterns change and stress levels increase, your diet changes. Young adults are always looking for a fast on-the-go meal. Many times, these meals have poor nutritional value. Weight gain can be common during this time. You should be aware of these many changes and reach out to health care providers and counselors to prevent these changes from affecting your overall well-being.
Illnesses College campuses are a prime breeding ground for communicable diseases. These diseases are spread by contact with blood, bodily fluids, and breathing airborne viruses. Many vaccine-preventable diseases are frequently seen among college students. COVID-19, influenza, meningococcal disease, and pneumococcal disease are just a few. Most student health insurance will cover immunizations. This is a good place to start to keep yourself healthy. High fever, nausea, vomiting, and headache are all common symptoms that can be seen with many of these diseases. Don’t try to guess what you have. Consult a health care professional or you may not receive the proper treatment and affect you long term.

What Is the ACA?

The ACA was enacted in 2010. The ACA health care reform law has two components: The Patient Protection and ACA (PPACA) and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act. You can read a compilation of the ACA, but here’s what you need to know:

  • Under the ACA, you may qualify for premium tax credits that make health insurance premiums more affordable.
  • It also enacted an expansion of Medicaid and cost-savings provisions.
  • The ACA also allows children and young adults to remain on their parents’ plan until age 26, if they choose.
  • ACA has also made provisions for the minimum standards of health coverage. Provisions include coverage for preexisting conditions, free birth control, and coverage for mental health, to name a few.

The future of the ACA is always clouded by political uncertainty. Each presidency brings some form of change. COVID-19 pandemic brought the addition of the American Rescue Plan Act on March 11, 2021. The law increased premium tax credits for all income brackets with no one paying more than 8.5% for their household toward the cost of a benchmark plan. The coverage years are for 2021 and 2022. December 2021 enrollments were at an all-time high of 13.6 million.

As recently as March 21, 2022, new provisions went into effect to allow an ongoing Special Enrollment Period for households with an annual household income of 150% of the federal poverty level or less that meet the Health Insurance Marketplace eligibility requirements. Considering the continued adjustments to expand enrollment options, ACA will likely continue to thrive for a while longer.

Health Insurance for Students and Young Adults: Where Do You Start?

Knowing basic insurance terminology is very important in your process of getting started. If you don’t know the correct terms you will find yourself very confused and could end up choosing a plan that is not right for you. Let’s look at some key terms.

Health Insurance Terms
Health Insurance Term Definition 
Premium The amount you pay for your health insurance monthly, quarterly or annually.
Deductible The amount of money you pay out of pocket before your insurance provider will pay any expenses.
Coinsurance The percent of cost for covered health services that you pay after you have paid the deductible. (Example: You pay 20% of $100)
Copay A fixed amount that you pay toward a specific expense. (Example: You pay a $30 copay for each regular doctor’s visit)
Network Providers, facilities and suppliers that your health plan is contracted with to provide health services.
Preventative Care Routine health care that includes screenings, immunizations, checkups and patient counseling to help prevent illness, disease and health problems.
Group Plan A group of people covered under one plan through an employer or organization.

What Else Should You Consider When Choosing A Plan?

It doesn’t matter if you are in school or venturing out on your own. When you choose a plan, always consider hidden expenses, the network area where you live, prescription drug coverage, and plan ratings. Continue reading for more insight.

  • Hidden expenses: Always make sure you are utilizing in-network providers or some services may not be covered. Watch for facility fees. For example, if the doctor you see has their office in a hospital complex, a facility fee may be charged.
  • Moving or going away to school: You want to always research the area you are moving to and find out what providers are available and if your plan is in network. Always check to see the type of insurance plans that are available. You could be eligible to enroll in a plan more suited for your new area through a SEP.
  • Prescription drug coverage: Prescription drugs may not be covered under a health care plan. Reduce your prescription costs by researching approved drug lists.
  • Insurers reviews: Ratings and reviews give you an idea of what current and former members think of a health insurance provider. You can also check insurer ratings to see how well a provider stacks up against its competition.

What Strategies Can Young Adults and Students Use to Manage Health Care Expenses?

Always remember to read the fine print. Check the limitations and exclusions on the plan you select. Pay attention to your budget. Invest in a Health Saving Account. Research hospital and public assistance programs that can help with excess cost. These are strategies for managing your health care expenses:

  • Budget: Always know your limits. Making a budget plan and finding insurance that fits your budget is important in helping you keep coverage. If you are having a procedure that is not an emergency, it’s a good practice to ask how much it will be and try to budget for it.
  • Use a Health Savings Account (HSA): An HSA is a type of savings account that you can put money into on a pretax basis. This money can later be used to cover qualified medical expenses.
  • Use public assistance: Two major types of assistance are social welfare programs and social insurance programs. Social welfare programs are based on low income and social insurance programs are based on age, employment status or veteran status.
  • Ask about hospital payment programs and assistance: Most nonprofit hospitals are required to have a financial assistance program or charity care. To find out if the hospital you use has this program, it’s best to check with the billing office manager. Never put off checking on this type of assistance. Guidelines are usually in place stipulating you start the application process with a specific number of days of receiving your first bill. For example, within the first 240 days of receiving the first bill.

State-by-State Student Health Insurance

Standard ACA

* Unless otherwise noted, under the terms of ACA, children in every state may choose to remain on their parents’ plan until age 26, whether employer-based or purchased through HealthCare.gov. If the plan was purchased through HealthCare.gov and the parents still claim the student as a dependent, the total household income is used to calculate the premium subsidy. If the student purchases a separate plan and the parents still claim the child as a dependent, no premium subsidy will be available.

Alabama

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Alabama college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Alabama: Standard ACA
  • Alabama college/university health coverage requirements: Requirements depend on the school. Some schools, such as the University of Alabama, only require health coverage for international students while others require health coverage for all undergraduates taking nine or more hours.
Coverage options for Alabama students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan v.s. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Arizona

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Arizona college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Arizona: Standard ACA
  • Arizona college/university health coverage requirements: Most colleges and universities in Arizona do not require health insurance, except for international students. However, be sure to check specific school requirements. All three state universities offer a health insurance plan administered by Aetna Student Health.
Coverage options for Arizona students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Arkansas

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Arkansas college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Arkansas: Standard ACA
  • Arkansas college/university health coverage requirements: There are no statewide requirements, but most colleges in Arkansas won’t require health insurance. Some schools may require students to pay a small health fee per credit hour for basic services while others may offer some services at reduced cost.
Coverage options for Arkansas students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

California

California is one of the few states that mandates health care coverage for all college students. Most colleges and universities offer school-sponsored health plans, and students may be automatically enrolled unless you opt out.

  • Health insurance options for California college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in California: Standard ACA. Additionally, if you are not claimed as a dependent, you may qualify for low-cost coverage through California’s expanded Medicaid system, Medi-Cal.
  • California college/university health coverage requirements: Health insurance is required for all residents, including college students. If you fail to buy health insurance, you will receive a $750 penalty when you file your state tax return.
Coverage options for California students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Colorado

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Colorado college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Colorado: Standard ACA
  • Colorado college/university health coverage requirements: There are no statewide requirements. Individual colleges and universities may have their own requirements, but most schools in Colorado will not require health insurance. Some schools may offer a Student Health Insurance Plan (SHIP) that’s administered by carriers such as Cigna and Anthem.
Coverage options for Colorado students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Connecticut

There are no specific statewide requirements, but most colleges and universities require health insurance. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Connecticut college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Connecticut: Standard ACA
  • Connecticut college/university health coverage requirements: There are no statewide requirements, but most schools in Connecticut require health insurance as a condition of admission. Many schools offer school-sponsored health plans, and some schools may require students to pay a health fee for basic services.
Coverage options for Connecticut students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Delaware

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Delaware has incorporated the protections of the ACA into state law, meaning that residents will still have the same rights if federal law should ever change. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Delaware college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Delaware: Standard ACA
  • Delaware college/university health coverage requirements: There are no statewide requirements for health insurance, but some schools require it. Most colleges and universities in Delaware offer affordable student health insurance plans for students without other coverage, and many offer on-campus medical services.
Coverage options for Delaware students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Florida

There are no specific statewide requirements, but most colleges and universities require health insurance. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Florida college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Florida: Standard ACA
  • Florida college/university health coverage requirements: There are no statewide requirements for health insurance, but most colleges and universities in Florida require health insurance as a condition of admission. Florida requires schools to charge a per-credit-hour fee that covers basic health services for students. Also, some schools may be reluctant to accept outside health insurance.
Coverage options for Florida students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Georgia

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Georgia college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Georgia: Standard ACA
  • Georgia college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide requirement for health insurance, although some schools require it. Most schools offer on-campus medical services that may either be free or billed at a reduced rate.
Coverage options for Georgia students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Hawaii

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Hawaii college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Hawaii: Standard ACA
  • Hawaii college/university health coverage requirements: There are no statewide requirements for health insurance, but some schools require it. The University of Hawaii system doesn’t require insurance, but Hawaii Pacific University requires some students to have it. Most schools offer on-campus routine health services either free or for a nominal fee.
Coverage options for Hawaii students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Idaho

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Idaho college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Idaho: Standard ACA
  • Idaho college/university health coverage requirements: Idaho does not mandate student health insurance, although some schools require it. The University of Idaho and Northwest Nazarene University require proof of insurance for admission while Boise State University does not. Schools may automatically enroll uninsured students into their student health insurance plan.
Coverage options for Idaho students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Illinois

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Illinois college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Illinois: Standard ACA
  • Illinois college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide requirement for health insurance, but many colleges and universities in Illinois require some or all students to have it. The University of Illinois requires all campus-based students to have insurance while DePaul University only requires it for international students.
Coverage options for Illinois students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Indiana

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Indiana college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Indiana: Standard ACA
  • Indiana college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide insurance requirement, although some colleges and universities in Indiana require it. Indiana University and Notre Dame do not require it while DePauw does. Most schools offer student health insurance plans and on-campus medical services.
Coverage options for Indiana students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Iowa

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Iowa college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Iowa: Standard ACA
  • Iowa college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide insurance mandate in Iowa, but some schools require it. The University of Iowa requires proof of insurance, and most schools offer student health insurance plans either through the school or through a private insurer
Coverage options for Iowa students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Kansas

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Kansas college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Kansas: Standard ACA
  • Kansas college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide insurance mandate for students, although some schools may require it. None of the 33 schools governed by the Kansas Board of Regents requires proof of insurance, but offers a student health insurance plan through UnitedHealthcare.
Coverage options for Kansas students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Kentucky

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Kentucky college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Kentucky : Standard ACA
  • Kentucky college/university health coverage requirements: There are no specific statewide requirements but some schools may require proof of insurance. The University of Kentucky charges a mandatory health fee for University Health Services and offers a comprehensive student health plan through Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield.
Coverage options for Kentucky students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Louisiana

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Louisiana college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Louisiana: Standard ACA
  • Louisiana college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide insurance mandate, although some schools may require it. Tulane University and Louisiana State University both offer a student health insurance plan through UnitedHealthcare.
Coverage options for Louisiana students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Maine

There are no specific statewide requirements, but most schools require health insurance. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Maine college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Maine: Standard ACA
  • Maine college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide insurance mandate but most colleges and universities in Maine require proof of insurance. The University of Maine system requires health insurance for all undergraduate students taking nine hours or more and all graduate students taking six hours or more. Students will be automatically enrolled in its student health insurance plan unless you opt out and show proof of other insurance.
Coverage options for Maine students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Maryland

There are no specific statewide requirements, but most colleges and universities require health insurance. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Maryland college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Maryland: Standard ACA
  • Maryland college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide insurance mandate, but most of the 50 colleges and universities in Maryland require proof of insurance as a condition of admission. The University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University both require all undergraduate, graduate, and international students taking six hours or more to have health insurance and automatically enroll students in the university’s student health insurance plan unless you opt out and show proof of other insurance.
Coverage options for Maryland students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Massachusetts

All colleges and universities require health insurance. Plan and service offerings will vary by school:

  • Health insurance options for Massachusetts college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Massachusetts: Standard ACA
  • Massachusetts college/university health coverage requirements: Massachusetts requires health insurance for all students 18 and over. Most colleges and universities, including the University of Massachusetts and Harvard University, offer affordable student health insurance plans that meet state requirements. Harvard also offers routine care through its University Health Services via a mandatory fee.
Coverage options for Massachusetts students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Michigan

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Michigan college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Michigan: Standard ACA
  • Michigan college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide insurance requirement, but some colleges and universities in Michigan require proof of insurance. University of Michigan Ann Arbor and Michigan State University strongly recommend health insurance, while Calvin University requires proof of insurance for admission.
Coverage options for Michigan students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Minnesota

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Minnesota college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Minnesota: Standard ACA
  • Minnesota college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide insurance requirement, although most colleges and universities in Minnesota require it as a condition of admission. University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Carleton College, and Macalester College all require proof of insurance and will automatically enroll students in the university’s student health plan unless you opt out and show proof of other coverage.
Coverage options for Minnesota students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Mississippi

There are no specific statewide requirements, and most schools will not require health insurance. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Mississippi college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Mississippi: Standard ACA
  • Mississippi college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide health insurance mandate and most students will not be required to show proof of insurance. The University of Mississippi does not require insurance but offers a student health insurance plan to students enrolled in nine hours or more. Mississippi State University requires health insurance for international students and also offers a student health plan. Jackson State University requires health insurance for students who live on campus and it does not offer a student health plan.
Coverage options for Mississippi students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Missouri

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Missouri college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Missouri: Standard ACA
  • Missouri college/university health coverage requirements: There is no specific statewide requirement for insurance, although some colleges and universities in Missouri require it. Washington University St. Louis requires proof of insurance and will automatically enroll students in the university’s student health plan unless you opt out and show proof of other coverage. University of Missouri Kansas City and Missouri State University Springfield strongly recommend health insurance for students and offer student health insurance plans.
Coverage options for Missouri students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Montana

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Montana college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Montana: Standard ACA
  • Montana college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide health insurance mandate in Montana, but some colleges and universities may require it. Montana State University and University of Montana both require insurance for students taking six hours or more and may automatically enroll students in a student health insurance plan unless you opt out and show proof of other insurance. Rocky Mountain College offers student health services, but does not offer a student health insurance plan.
Coverage options for Montana students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plans An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Nebraska

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Nebraska college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Nebraska: Standard ACA
  • Nebraska college/university health coverage requirements: There is no specific requirement for health insurance in Nebraska. although some schools may require it. Most colleges and universities offer student health insurance plans through a private carrier.
Coverage options for Nebraska students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Nevada

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Nevada college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Nevada: Standard ACA
  • Nevada college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide health insurance mandate, although some schools may require it. University of Nevada Reno requires all graduate and medical students to provide proof of insurance and will automatically enroll students in a student health insurance plan unless you opt out and show proof of other insurance. The University of Nevada Las Vegas has similar requirements. Sierra Nevada University requires all undergraduate students to have health insurance, but does not offer a student health insurance plan.
Coverage options for Nevada students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

New Hampshire

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for New Hampshire college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in New Hampshire: Standard ACA
  • New Hampshire college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide health care mandate, although most colleges and universities in New Hampshire require proof of insurance for all students.
Coverage options for New Hampshire students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

New Jersey

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for New Jersey college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in New Jersey: Standard ACA
  • New Jersey college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide health care mandate, although most colleges and universities in New Jersey require proof of insurance for all students.
Coverage options for New Jersey students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

New Mexico

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for New Mexico college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in New Mexico: Standard ACA
  • New Mexico college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide health care mandate in New Mexico, although some schools may require proof of insurance. The University of New Mexico offers a student health insurance plan administered by Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico.
Coverage options for New Mexico students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

New York

There are no specific statewide requirements, but many schools require health insurance. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for New York college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in New York: Standard ACA
  • New York college/university health coverage requirements: There is no specific statewide requirement for health insurance in New York. Most colleges and universities offer a student health insurance plan, either through the school or through a private carrier. Columbia University and Cornell University both require health insurance for most students.
Coverage options for New York students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

North Carolina

There are no specific statewide requirements, but many schools require health insurance. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for North Carolina college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in North Carolina: Standard ACA
  • North Carolina college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide health insurance mandate, although most colleges and universities in North Carolina require it. All 17 schools in the University of North Carolina system, Duke University, and Wake Forest University all require proof of insurance. Students must either enroll in the school’s student health insurance plan or opt out and show proof of other insurance.
Coverage options for North Carolina students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

North Dakota

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for North Dakota college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in North Dakota: Standard ACA
  • North Dakota college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide health insurance requirement. University of North Dakota and North Dakota State University offer student health insurance plans to international students, but not to U.S. residents.
Coverage options for North Dakota students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Ohio

There are no specific statewide requirements, but many schools require health insurance. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Ohio college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Ohio: Standard ACA
  • Ohio college/university health coverage requirements: Ohio does not require health insurance for students, but most colleges and universities offer student health insurance plans, either through the school or through a private carrier. Ohio State University, Case Western Reserve University, and Kenyon College all require some or all students to show proof of insurance.
Coverage options for Ohio students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Oklahoma

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Oklahoma college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Oklahoma: Standard ACA
  • Oklahoma college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide insurance mandate. Oklahoma State University and University of Oklahoma require international students to have health insurance, and both offer a student health insurance plan.
Coverage options for Oklahoma students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Oregon

There are no specific statewide requirements, but many schools require health insurance as a condition of admission. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Oregon college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Oregon: Standard ACA
  • Oregon college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide health insurance mandate in Oregon, but many colleges and universities require it. Oregon State University requires proof of health insurance for all students and offers student health insurance plan for international students. The University of Oregon offers a plan to all students.
Coverage options for Oregon students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Pennsylvania

There are no specific statewide requirements, but most schools require health insurance as a condition of admission. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Pennsylvania college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Pennsylvania: Standard ACA
  • Pennsylvania college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide mandate, but most colleges and universities require proof of health insurance. Penn State, Temple University, and University of Pittsburgh all require health insurance, and all offer reasonably priced student health insurance plans.
Coverage options for Pennsylvania students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Rhode Island

All colleges and universities in Rhode Island require health insurance for students, and most offer student health insurance plans.

  • Health insurance options for Rhode Island college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Rhode Island: Standard ACA
  • Rhode Island college/university health coverage requirements: All colleges and universities in Rhode Island require health insurance for students. Most will automatically enroll students in the university’s student health insurance plans unless you out and show proof of other insurance.
Coverage options for Rhode Island students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

South Carolina

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for South Carolina college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in South Carolina: Standard ACA
  • South Carolina college/university health coverage requirements: South Carolina does not require health insurance statewide, but many schools require it. The University of South Carolina requires all students to have insurance while Clemson changes its requirements from year to year. Both offer student health insurance plans.
Coverage options for South Carolina students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

South Dakota

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for South Dakota college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in South Dakota: Standard ACA
  • South Dakota college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide mandate, but the South Dakota Board of Regents requires that international students and student athletes have health insurance. Colleges and universities generally do not offer school-sponsored health plans.
Coverage options for South Dakota students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Tennessee

There are no specific statewide requirements, but many schools require health insurance as a condition of admission. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Tennessee college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Tennessee: Standard ACA
  • Tennessee college/university health coverage requirements: Tennessee does not require health insurance for students, but some schools may require it. The University of Tennessee offers a student health insurance plan, and the Tennessee Board of Regents operates a student health insurance exchange.
Coverage options for Tennessee students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Texas

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Texas college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Texas: Standard ACA
  • Texas college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide mandate, but some colleges and universities in Texas require health insurance. Additionally, those that do may not accept existing coverage. Most Texas schools offer on-campus health care for minor issues such as the flu at no cost as long as the student pays a health service fee. Texas law allows schools with medical or dental programs to require health insurance for those students due to occupational hazard.
Coverage options for Texas students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Utah

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Utah college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Utah: Standard ACA
  • Utah college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide requirement for health insurance, although some colleges and universities offer school-sponsored health plans.
Coverage options for Utah students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Vermont

Most colleges and universities require health insurance as a condition of admission. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Vermont college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Vermont: Standard ACA
  • Vermont college/university health coverage requirements: Vermont doesn’t mandate student health insurance, but almost all colleges and universities require it. Many schools automatically enroll students in a school-sponsored plan unless you opt out and show proof of other insurance.
Coverage options for Vermont students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Virginia

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Virginia college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Virginia: Standard ACA
  • Virginia college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide mandate in Virginia. University of Virginia Charlottesville and William & Mary both require all students to have health insurance, but Virginia Tech doesn’t. All three offer school-sponsored health plans and on-campus medical services.
Coverage options for Virginia students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Washington

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Washington college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Washington: Standard ACA
  • Washington college/university health coverage requirements: There is no specific requirement for health insurance statewide, although some schools may require it. Eastern and Western Washington University both offer school-sponsored health plans with online enrollment. Some schools such as University of Washington offer school-sponsored health plans to international students, but not to U.S. residents.
Coverage options for Washington students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

West Virginia

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for West Virginia college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in West Virginia: Standard ACA
  • West Virginia college/university health coverage requirements: There is no specific statewide mandate for health insurance, but many colleges and universities require it as a condition of admission. West Virginia University requires all students to carry health insurance, and many schools offer school-sponsored student health insurance plans.
Coverage options for West Virginia students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Wisconsin

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Wisconsin college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Wisconsin: Standard ACA
  • Wisconsin college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide mandate for health insurance, but many schools require it as a condition of admission. Lawrence University requires all students to have health insurance either privately or through a school-sponsored plan. Most other colleges and Universities offer student health plans that generally cover less and have more exclusions than typical health insurance.
Coverage options for Wisconsin students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An examples are Affordable Care Act -mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace or an employer sponsored group plan

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

Wyoming

There are no specific statewide requirements, but some schools may have requirements. Plan and service options vary by school.

  • Health insurance options for Wyoming college students:
    • Remain on your parents’ plan
    • Purchase an individual or family plan through HealthCare.gov
    • Purchase a student health plan through a private insurer
    • Enroll in a school-sponsored plan, if available
    • Purchase a catastrophic health care plan if you are under 30
    • Take advantage of discounted student health services if offered by the school
  • Dependency rules in Wyoming: Standard ACA
  • Wyoming college/university health coverage requirements: There is no statewide mandate for health insurance, but many schools require it as a condition of admission.
Coverage options for Wyoming students
Option Description Who Qualifies Pros Cons
Parents’ Plan An insurance plan that allows a parent to cover dependents, often through an employer group plan Coverage to age 26 even if you marry, leave school, have a child, don’t live with your parents, or they don’t claim you on their taxes Can be less expensive for parents to bundle as a family plan

 

Parents’ employer may contribute to the cost

Some group plans are not required to have maternity coverage for dependents

 

If you live in a different state from your parents, their plan may have a limited provider area, if any

School-sponsored Plan Cover you on the school campus or in the state you are attending school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More affordable Only covered while you are actively attending school and meeting a specific number of credit hours

 

Limited to coverage at on-campus facilities

Student Health Plan Coverage you can purchase from the school that covers you on and off campus and outside the state where you attend school Varies by school You are usually required to have a minimum number of credit hours More flexibility Coverage can last the entire year

 

Not restricted to only using on campus

 

Can be covered by financial aid if you qualify

Only covers the academic year

 

Limited type of plan options

Individual or Family Plans Allows coverage for an individual or can include family members

 

An example is ACA-mandated minimum essential coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace

Depends on the type of plan. The guidelines may be different for a group plan vs. a standard ACA plan

 

Coverage for dependence is up to age 26

More plan options available

 

Subsidies may apply for some plans

 

Employer-sponsored plans available in some cases

Network providers vary by state

 

Coverage can end the day you leave an employer-sponsored plan

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Insurance and health care consultant

Tammy Burns is an experienced health insurance advisor. She earned her nursing degree in 1990 from Jacksonville State University, obtained her insurance billing and coding certification in 1995, and holds a health and life insurance license in Alabama, Georgia, Iowa, Mississippi, and Tennessee. Burns is Affordable Care Act (ACA)-certified for health insurance and other ancillary, life, and annuity products. She maintains an active nursing license and practices private-duty nursing.

Burns’ background as a nurse, insurance biller and coder, and insurance consultant includes infectious disease, oncology, gynecology, phlebotomy, post operative, family medicine, geriatrics, home health, hospice, human resources, management, billing, coding, claims, fixed annuities, group and individual health and life products, and Medicare. She’s always been driven by a desire to help people, spending more than 25 years as a practicing nurse in hospitals, private doctors’ offices, home health, and hospice. As a nurse, Burns supported patients filing insurance claims with Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance companies as well as responding to billing questions from confused patients.

Seeing firsthand how unsuspecting patients are frequently confused by an overly complex system they don’t understand led Burns to become an insurance agent and health care consultant, now helping people understand the medical system. Since becoming an insurance agent in 2013, she has worked with some of the largest and most reputable insurance carriers and agencies in the nation, and she has built a large and loyal clientele by way of her commitment to transparency and personalized service.

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